Home » British tourists fight back against Majorca and Ibiza boozy holiday crackdown

British tourists fight back against Majorca and Ibiza boozy holiday crackdown

In a showdown between British tourists and the authorities in Spain’s Balearic Islands, holidaymakers are refusing to succumb to a crackdown on alcohol-fuelled vacations, accusing the government of stifling beloved resorts.

Popular tourist hubs like Palma, Llucmajor, and Magaluf in Majorca, as well as San Antonio in Ibiza, have intensified measures to curb rowdy behaviour. These measures include increasing fines for drinking in public, implementing nighttime alcohol sale bans in shops, and imposing restrictions on party boats.

Under the tougher regulations, partygoers can face fines ranging from €500 to €1,500 (£430 to £1,290) if their street drinking disturbs public peace. Party boats are now restricted from operating within one nautical mile of designated areas and are prohibited from picking up or dropping off passengers.

Additionally, shops in areas designated as experiencing “excessive tourism” must now close completely between 9.30pm and 8am. Public activities such as organising drinking parties, spraying graffiti, riding scooters, and displaying nudity are also banned.

Expressing their discontent with the new rules, British tourists in Magaluf told the Mail Online about the impact on their holiday experience.

Daniel Vella from Portsmouth said: “Magaluf is for a good time. If you are coming to a place for a party, you should be able to party.”

His sentiments were echoed by Bradley Shetland-Carter, who said: “We are English, we are British, we drink a lot.”

Charlie Jay from Torquay also stressed Magaluf’s reputation as a party destination. He said: “Everyone knows Magaluf for what it is.”

He argued that attempts to change this reputation would be futile. Similarly, Carl Shurley from Leicestershire criticised the crackdown, claiming that it was transforming Magaluf from a party resort to a family-oriented destination. He expressed concern that the changes would deter tourists and ultimately harm the local economy.

Despite the resistance from holidaymakers, the Balearic Islands government remains steadfast in its efforts to maintain order and tranquillity in these popular tourist destinations. As the debate continues, the future of boozy holidays in Majorca and Ibiza hangs in the balance.